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Eustreptospondylus oxoniensis  (Phillips, 1871)

Name Means: "Well Reversed Spine" Length: 25 - 30 feet (7 - 9 m)
Pronounced: u-Strep-toe-spon-Di-lus Weight: 1-2 tons(900 - 1,800 kilos)
When it lived: Jurassic 161-159 million years ago    
Where found: Oxford, England    

Introduction

   Eustreptospondylus oxoniensis is a typical theropod dinosaur - a bipedal carnivore with a large head armed with sharp blade-like teeth, a short neck, reduced forelimb, and a long tail to balance the body. The skeleton is that of an immature animal some 4.5 metres long.  The fossile skelton is on display at the Oxford University Museum. It is the most complete example of a "carnosaur" in Western Europe, and the only specimen of the species. Scientists have determined that it as a teenager.  It is one of those dinsoaurs where there is enough fossil material to get a pretty idea of what it looked like, but not enough to answer all the questions.

Discovery

     The skeleton was collected in 1871 by James Parker, the bookseller of Broad Street, whose interests included archaeology and geology. It was found in a brickpit in the Oxford Clay (about 155 million years old) under what is now playing fields opposite St Edward's School in North Oxford. The Oxford Clay is an offshore marine deposit and the bones are those of a corpse which was washed out to sea before sinking.

 
 

 

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